Since 2000, the price of housing has increased drastically and the amount of families unable to afford it has also gone up.

A new study from the Urban Institute reveals that without exception, from Alaska to Florida, not one single country in the United States has enough affordable housing units.

Every single county in the United States is facing an affordable housing crisis. Image 1.

Counties pictured above in darker blue have a higher number of units per 100 families.

In 2013, for every family living in extreme poverty, (measured by the total household income being no more than 30% of the median income in any given county), only 28 out of 100 were able to afford housing. 

When compared to data from 2000, less counties measure up, even if the amount of federal assistance has increased.

Every single county in the United States is facing an affordable housing crisis. Image 2.

This map shows the year 2000 on the left and 2013 on the right, including government assistance.

Furthermore, without federal assistance from the HUD, the numbers would drop even further. For example, in Pulaski County, Arkansas, the cutoff for low-income for a family of four is $18,650. In 2013, 15,000 families met the criteria. Currently 24 out of 100 families can find affordable living, but without assistance, zero of them would be able to find housing.

 Every single county in the United States is facing an affordable housing crisis. Image 3.

Affordable housing units available without government assistance.

The data was compiled from the U.S. Census Bureau and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

The Urban Institute provides an interactive county by county map here.

All images: The Urban Institute